liveonearth: (Default)
Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity.
- John Muir
liveonearth: (Default)
I am a lover of what is, not because I'm a spiritual person, but because it hurts when I argue with reality. We can know that reality is good just as it is, because when we argue with it, we experience tension and frustration. We don't feel natural or balanced. When we stop opposing reality, action becomes simple, fluid, kind, and fearless.
~ Byron Katie
liveonearth: (praying girl)
There are no gods, no devils,
no angels, no heaven or hell.
There is only our natural world.
Religion is but myth and superstition
that hardens hearts
and enslaves minds.


--Inscription planned for a monument
to be installed on Arkansas Capitol grounds,
if the state persists displaying
the 10 commandments.
liveonearth: (Hands w/ Lotus)
I found an awesome tree key online. Here: http://bioimages.vanderbilt.edu/tree-key/simple-leaf-trees.htm This one is only good for trees with "simple" leaves, meaning that they are not compound, or rather, that only one leaflet is on the leaf stem. Some trees like walnuts and ashes have many leaves extending from the leaf stem.

More than you wanted to know--unless you are into knowing about trees. =-]
liveonearth: (mad scientist's union)
Science is not sick. It never has been. Science is how we can reveal the secrets of the universe. It is a slow, iterative, arduous process. It makes mistakes but it is self-correcting. That doesn’t mean that the mistakes don’t sometimes stick around for centuries. Sometimes it takes new technologies, discoveries, or theories (all of which are of course themselves part of science) to make progress. Fundamental laws of nature will perhaps keep us from ever discovering certain things, say, what happens when you approach the speed of light, leaving them for theoretical consideration only. But however severe the errors, provided our species doesn’t become extinct through cataclysmic cosmic events or self-inflicted destruction, science has the potential to correct them.

---the Devil's Neuroscientist (alter ego of Sam Schwartzkopf)
in a 12/10/14 blogpost entitled: Why all research findings are false
https://devilsneuroscientist.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/why-all-research-findings-are-false/
liveonearth: (moon)
...is worth overdoing. That was their mantra.

Completely Recommend.
is worth overdoing. )
liveonearth: (blue skinned alien)
Don't ask yourself what the world needs.
Ask yourself what makes you come alive,
and go do that,
because what the world needs
is people who have come alive.


~Howard Thurman
liveonearth: (moon)

Kayaking on this class V section will be permitted, and the management team there sounds quite reasonable about letting management evolve along with use. The use of this river section can be revoked if there is any paddling on Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, where boating is banned.

The run will start at Pothole Dome below Tuolumne Meadows and end at Pate Valley. Exact details about put-in, take-out, portage trails and landing/no-landing zone locations will be determined in the near future in consultation with the boating community, tribal interests and National Park Service resource experts. Boaters making the run will be required to carry their boats 3 miles to the put-in, and carry them 8 miles from the take-out at Pate Valley to the White Wolf trailhead.

Carrying your kayak 11 miles is hard. The info does not indicate that this section of river is a series of long slides over domes of granite. I do not know if anyone has been running it lately, but I do remember that Lars Holbek carried his boat most of the way and didn't want to do it again. I have HIKED down the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne on a 3 day backpacking trip, and it was spectacular. A backpack trip might be a good way to scout the whitewater before committing in a boat. Though it is possible that those California boaters think nothing of this stuff. Looks hair to me.



SOURCE
http://www.americanwhitewater.org/content/Article/view/articleid/31898/
liveonearth: (Where the wild things are)
The environment we're used to is designed to sustain us. We live like fish in an aquarium. Food comes mysteriously down, oxygen bubbles up. We are the domestic pets of a human zoo we call civilization. Then we go into nature, where we are least among equals with all other creatures. There we are put to the test. Most of us sleep through the test. We get in and out and never know what might have been demanded. Such an experience can make us even more vulnerable, for we come away with the illusion of growing hardy, salty, knowledgeable: Been there, done that.
--Laurence Gonzales in Deep Survival, page 133.
liveonearth: (flower and bird)
The Peace of Wild Things

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children's lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.
liveonearth: (praying girl)
We evolved to be tribal, and politics is a competition among coalitions of tribes. When people feel that a group they value--be it racial, religious, regional, or ideological--is under attack, they rally to its defense, even at some cost to themselves. The great trick that humans developed at some point in the last few hundred thousand years is the ability to circle around a tree, rock, ancestor, flag, book, or god, and then treat that thing as sacred. People who worship the same idol can trust one another, work as a team, and prevail over less cohesive groups. So if you want to understand politics, and especially our divisive culture wars, you must follow the sacredness.
--Psychologist Jonathan Haidt in NYT
(quoted here from The Week)
liveonearth: (Default)
When I grow up I'm gonna be a tree
Wanta make my home with the birds and the bees and
The squirrels they can count on me
When I grow up to be a tree
refrain is: I'm gonna reach--another Misty River tune )
liveonearth: (Lillies)
Every morning
the world
is created.
Under the orange
the rest )
liveonearth: (owls)
Man's attitude toward nature is today critically important simply because we have now acquired a fateful power to alter and destroy nature.
But man is a part of nature, and his war against nature is inevitably a war against himself...

--Rachel Carson, 1963
liveonearth: (Where the wild things are)
The Peace of Wild Things
by Wendell Berry

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children's lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.
liveonearth: (flowing_creek)

Rivers are magnets for the imagination, for conscious pondering
and subconscious dreams, thrills and fears. People stare into the moving water,
captivated, as they are when gazing into a fire. What is it that draws and holds us?
The rivers’ reflections of our lives and experiences are endless. The water calls up
our own ambitions of flowing with ease, of navigating the unknown. Streams
represent constant rebirth. The waters flow in, forever new, yet forever the same;
they complete a journey from beginning to end, and then they embark on the
journey again.
--Tim Palmer
liveonearth: (Default)
I only went out for a walk,
and finally concluded to stay out ‘til sundown,
for going out, I found, was really going in.
~John Muir
liveonearth: (Default)
Jung thought that "civilized man...is in danger of losing all contact with the world of instinct" and this loss "is largely responsible for the pathological condition of contemporary culture".

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